The Silent Minority

Shilling

It appears that the leader of the Senate Democrats plans to solve her party’s problem of persuading Wisconsin voters to choose their ideas by giving up on offering ideas altogether.

Scott Bauer, Wisconsin’s chief Associated Press reporter, tweeted this earlier today:

Evidently, Sen. Shilling doesn’t think it’s up to the minority party to have any answers. In fact, in a radio interview on WPR several years ago, then-Representative from the 95th Jennifer Shilling said “it’s hard to get anything done when you’re in the minority.”

Indeed, especially if you throw in the towel before the match even begins.

There was a rare sense of bipartisan unity during the Assembly Committee on Transportation’s marathon hearing on transportation funding yesterday – for better or for worse, depending on your position on raising the gas tax or other fees to pay for more transportation funding.

Apparently Sen. Shilling doesn’t want any part of that – and doesn’t want to lift a finger to help forge a long-term funding solution for Wisconsin’s roads.

Sen. Shilling recently won re-election after a recount confirmed her 60-vote victory over Dan Kapanke. Perhaps if Kapanke had won, voters in the 32nd would have a voice at the table as the debate over transportation rages on.

The Senate Democratic caucus has shrunk to a core consisting largely of urban senators that will be strongly affected by the decisions the next legislature makes. One has to wonder what they think of Sen. Shilling’s proclamation that Republicans “own this legislature right now.”

About the writer: Chris Rochester is editor in chief of Morning Martini. He’s a communication specialist with experience in the private sector and on various campaigns. He's the communications director for the John K. MacIver Institute for Public Policy. Commentary here is strictly his own.